Free eBay Tips







Free Ebay tip #1: (A new take on keywords, so read it all!) Keywords you put in your item description are the key to your Ebay success. Put in any word or phrase that legitimately pertains to your item, a word or phrase a potential bidder might type as his search word or phrase. For example, I list a lot of celebrity items--mostly magazines, sports cards, photos--& often, I begin my description by saying, for instance, "The pride of Hoboken, New Jersey, Frank Sinatra became a big . . ." -- see how I squeezed in his name & state, both words that might be searched for by local collectors. Your choice of keywords is limited only by your imagination.

It pays to take an extra 10 minutes to do a thorough description of your item. Don't settle for doing a paragraph. Many times, when I see an item with a paragraph description, I just laugh & bid on it, knowing that I can do a better job of listing it than the seller did.

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#2: (This tip has become obsolete with Ebay's ending "Me" pages.) Do this today. This is the best thing an Ebay user can do! Ready to get free Ebay advertising & get more traffic to your auctions? Here's how:

Create your "ABOUT ME" page here (it's fast & easy). Once your "About Me" page is up and running, you need to start being at least an occasional message poster on the various Ebay message boards.

You can either add a comment to an on-going discussion or start a new discussion of your own. And any time someone reads any of your comments, an icon link to your "About Me" page will be available to them. Ebay users are curious creatures, and they will be curious about you . . . and your auctions, so they will click on your "About Me" link and be presented with all your auctions.

These message boards perform like neon-lit billboards for your auctions; but be careful, because they are quite addictive!

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#3: Sellers--specialize! Devote most of your activity to 1 or 2 areas, such as sports cards or whatever. When you specialize, you slowly gain knowledge of your field, & if you do it long enough, you acquire expert knowledge, & you will have, as a bidder or as a garage sale browswer, a good idea of what an item is worth & whether or not you might auction it for a profit.

Specialization has other benefits. You get more repeat customers, & people spread the word about how "So-and-so" (you!) might have this or that item, & that So-and-so is trustworthy. (I've even had a couple regulars tell me that one of the first things they do each day is check my auctions because I list what they bid on.)

Customer service, always crucial, is even more crucial to a specialist, because you want the good word spread about you, not the bad. Tend to these customer service details by wrapping items securely, double-checking every address you write, shipping promptly, & refusing to gouge anyone on postage.

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#4: Sellers, be seasonal. If there's a holiday coming up, mention it in your item description; and if you are able to couple that holiday with some hot item, even one having nothing to do with the item you're listing, include that, too; for instance, at Christmastime, I close my listings with: "Have a Harry Potter Christmas." This will bring Christmas browsers & Harry Potter browsers to your item.

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#5: When typing the item description for your listing, try to type numerals instead of spelling out numbers; for instance, type "16" instead of "sixteen." This is because a lot of potential bidders do searches for single items from a set, like card 16 from a set of 250 trading cards. People looking up items having nothing to do with what you're selling might have their eye caught by your listing, just because they have numerals in common. And the idea is to get as many eyeballs on your listing as you can.

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#6: ( Two basic tips counted as one): (9a.) Use a spell checker of some sort to check all the words used in your item description. Whenever an Ebay user clicks the box beneath the search box, the box saying "Search in title & description," that turns every word in your description into a keyword (words used by people doing searches for items), instead of only the keywords in your title. A misspelled keyword is a squandered opportunity. (9b.) Learn a little HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) to jazz up your listings. It's not that difficult, and it's fun.

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#7: Do searches for items similar to the ones you put up for auction. You can learn plenty from your competition. What do the listings of these other sellers have that yours don't? Can you improve on something they do?

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#8: When you sell items in lots, be sure to mention in your listing how much the buyer will save on postage buying in lots instead of individual items; do the math & show the actual savings.

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#9: Put something friendly at the end of your auction listings. It can be anything from "Thanks for looking" to "Please email me about any questions you might have about this item." This builds confidence and a sense of goodwill--repeat customers.

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#10: When composing your item title, whenever you can, include the words old, vintage, and sexy. These are traffic builders and some of the more popular search words other than proper nouns. Think up some others!

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#11: I skip bidding on a lot of auctions because of excessive postage. Don't gouge and alienate your customers by charging excessive postage. Charge only what it costs to mail plus enough to cover the true cost of your package, & no more. The lower your postage, the more bidders you will have, thus more money in your pocket.

Give bidders an option to buy insurance; that can save everyone headaches if something goes amiss; and when that inevitable something does go wrong, you, as seller, will be able to ask: "Was the item you bid on insured?" That will put you in a position of bargaining strength when something is lost in the mail.

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#12: Cutting down on the number of items returned to you is easy. You need only be thoroughly descriptive in your item descriptions (showing an image of the item always helps too). Leave nothing out. If there is a tiny crease in the item, say so. To omit mentioning these things frustrates customers and gives you an air of not being trustworthy, and those customers will avoid your future listings like they were Typhoid Mary. Reading a longer description is much better than a bidder having to repackage the item you sent and send it back to you.

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#13: In your item listings, use simple words that everyone knows.

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#14: Feedback is important. But don't let someone's having a negative or two keep you from bidding on one of their items. All sellers run into that customer who is impossible to please no matter how far they bend over for him. And someone may have given them a vengeance feedback, one that had nothing at all to do with the actual transaction.

So unless someone has a disproportionate amount of negative feedback, you might consider giving him or her the chance to please you as a customer. It's up to you. They just may have the bargain of the century for you. And they will be eager to rehabilitate their "tarnished" image of having negative feedback. However, do be wary, and show good sense in all your transactions.

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#15: When you leave feedback, as a bidder or as a seller, always mention--specifically--what item was exchanged (not the item number, something like "...the great Lady Diana magazine"). That way, people viewing feedback will see what item you just acquired that they might like to own. And if you have sold an item, maybe they will think you have one more that they can purchase. It gives feedback viewers a chance to see what kind of merchandise you bid on or sell. This trick can make all your customers' and sellers' feedback act as a more active link to your items than some static feedback that says nothing but "Great deal. A+++." And while the link to the item expires after some 30 days, your mention of the item will remain till Doomsday. This is a "red-letter" bonus because most Ebay users aren't doing it . . . yet! (Just check anyone's feedback & see.)

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#16: Pocket $10 or 10 cents at a time as an Ebay affiliate.
It can really add up over a year's time!

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#17: Relate your website to an Ebay auction niche & increase traffic

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BONUS EBAY TIP: Link to this page so I can make more new Ebay users comfortable about bidding on your auctions.

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